News
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News

I’m excited to have finally begun my motorcycle project! I was given a Honda CX500 in poor condition as a starting point. My plan is to rebuild the tank and body work from aluminum sheet. This is a process I have always wanted to learn but have little experience with. To get over the vertigo of not knowing where to begin, I’m roughing out design possibilities with styrofoam. No telling how many attempts it will take before I eventually get a form worth translating into a metal pattern. Bear with me, this one may take a while.

Yesterday I made the mistake of saying “I kinda want to build some models of shapes to make patterns from.  Maybe out of styrofoam, but where am I gonna find a huge chunk?”  Then Jeremy says “Oh, theres one on the curb a block from here”.

So now I am the proud owner of a huge block of styrofoam.  I had to whip up a 13 volt hot wire cutter to process it into manageable pieces.  Next up is a smaller, more precise cutter to do detail work.

Getting “Head Case #2” ready for the destructive force that is Maker Faire!  He’ll be on display in the Applied Kinetic Arts booth in the South East corner of Expo Hall, San Mateo fairgrounds Saturday and Sunday, May 19-20.

He’ll be in good company too: Benjamin Cowden, Mark Galt, Aaron Geman, Jonathan Foote, and Tal Avitzur.

See the link below for a full program of exhibitors and events:

http://cdn.makezine.com/make/makerfaire/bayarea/2012/MF12BA_Program_LoResFINAL.pdf

Mayday! Mayday!

New piece finished up last minute before our show this weekend!

A stranger in an even stranger land finds himself in peril, desperate for a safe place to land.

Materials:

Radio cabinet, chalk line, license plate light bulb cover, typewriter cooling fan blade, radio tuning knobs, book illustration clippings, fresnel lens, LEDs, motors

Mayday! Mayday!

New piece finished up last minute before our show this weekend!

A stranger in an even stranger land finds himself in peril, desperate for a safe place to land.

Materials:

Radio cabinet, chalk line, license plate light bulb cover, typewriter cooling fan blade, radio tuning knobs, book illustration clippings, fresnel lens, LEDs, motors

Here is the video for my new piece: ”High Voltage“ 2012 (102” x 65” x 24”)

This sculpture uses an effect known as a “Jacob’s Ladder”.  A high voltage arc is produced by way of a neon sign transformer, and then transmitted up the electrodes in the sculptures head.  I’m personally very pleased with the movement with this one.  All the action is generated within the abdomen.  The little pistons in the ankles act as shock absorbers to smooth out the motion.

Materials:

Industrial water valve, scaffold tubing, street light support arms, glass tube, vacuum cleaners, lamp fixtures, bicycle pedal cranks, neon sign transformer, gears from floor polisher, magnifying lens, drain cover, high voltage vacuum tubes, hydraulic dampers, plastic, phenolic, motor, LEDs

New piece to share: “High Voltage“ 2012 (102” x 65” x 24”)

This sculpture uses an effect known as a “Jacob’s Ladder”.  A high voltage arc is produced by way of a neon sign transformer, and then transmitted up the electrodes in the sculptures head.  I’m personally very pleased with the movement with this one.  All the action is generated within the abdomen.  The little pistons in the ankles act as shock absorbers to smooth out the motion.

Materials:

Industrial water valve, scaffold tubing, street light support arms, glass tube, vacuum cleaners, lamp fixtures, bicycle pedal cranks, neon sign transformer, gears from floor polisher, magnifying lens, drain cover, high voltage vacuum tubes, hydraulic dampers, plastic, phenolic, motor, LEDs

Here is the video for my new piece:

Cycloptopus” 2012 (65” x 57” x 29”)

Cycloptopus is a fearsome hybrid of two of my favorite monsters, one real, one mythical.  This creature is particularly dangerous because of its irritability.  You’d be irritable too if you were powered by an open flame and your body was made of wood.

Materials:

Radio cabinets, rocking chairs, fake fireplace, decorative clock elements, cabinet knobs, wall paper, chair parts, lamp parts, wheel hub, motors, LEDs

New piece to share: “Cycloptopus” 2012 (65” x 57” x 29”)

Cycloptopus is a fearsome hybrid of two of my favorite monsters, one real, one mythical.  This creature is particularly dangerous because of its irritability.  You’d be irritable too if you were powered by an open flame and your body was made of wood.

Materials:

Radio cabinets, rocking chairs, fake fireplace, decorative clock elements, cabinet knobs, wall paper, chair parts, lamp parts, wheel hub, motors, LEDs

I’m excited to announce that we’ll be having another open house and exhibit at my studio in Oakland.
  

The reception will be Friday May 11 from 5-9pm, and we’ll be open the following Saturday May 12 from 1-4pm
Our address is 305 Center Street, Oakland CA
 
I’ll have two new large scale pieces on display that are scheduled to be temporarily installed at Google’s offices in Mountainview at the end of May.  Since Google’s campus is not open to the public, I wanted to take this opportunity to share the work with you all first!
 
In addition to myself, my good friends and neighbors Jeremy Mayer and Jesse Small will have their studios open with work on display and we’re honored to have Scott Hove and Aimee Baldwin displaying their works with us in the gallery.
 
Please feel free to pass this invitation along to anyone you think might be interested (here is a link to our Facebook event if you’re into that kind of thing). 

This is my latest attempt to solve the puzzle of user interface. You’re looking at a photography dark room timer routed to a high amp relay. The user pushes the bright red button to activate up to six sculptures plugged in to the back of the box for a period of one to sixty seconds. This provides people with something they can interact with without exposing the art to mishandling. UV LEDs make use of the timers glow in the dark face.