robot Archives - Nemo Gould
-1
archive,tag,tag-robot,tag-60,theme-bridge,bridge-core-2.2.8,woocommerce-no-js,ajax_updown,page_not_loaded,,vertical_menu_enabled,side_area_uncovered_from_content,columns-3,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-21.5,qode-theme-bridge,disabled_footer_bottom,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.2.0,vc_responsive

robot Tag

Yesterday the New York Times ran an article by Trevor Tondro about the fabulous home of Jonathan and Wendy Segal in San Diego.  The impeccable taste of its owners was demonstrated by the placement of two of my smaller pieces: “Psychos-O-matic” and “A Head for Numbers” (Works by Dan Jones were also shown but not credited).  Its always a joy for me to see where these pieces wind up, especially when its in homes as lovely as this.

20140320-LOCATION-slide-MXRX-superJumboPhoto: Trevor Tondro

PsychosOmatic20092“Pyschos-O-Matic” 2009 Photo: Cameron Platt

 

Numbers“A Head for Numbers” 2009 Photo: Nemo Gould

 

Getting “Head Case #2” ready for the destructive force that is Maker Faire!  He’ll be on display in the Applied Kinetic Arts booth in the South East corner of Expo Hall, San Mateo fairgrounds Saturday and Sunday, May 19-20.

He’ll be in good company too: Benjamin Cowden, Mark Galt, Aaron Geman, Jonathan Foote, and Tal Avitzur.

See the link below for a full program of exhibitors and events:

http://cdn.makezine.com/make/makerfaire/bayarea/2012/MF12BA_Program_LoResFINAL.pdf

Here is the video for my new piece: ”High Voltage“ 2012 (102” x 65” x 24”)

This sculpture uses an effect known as a “Jacob’s Ladder”.  A high voltage arc is produced by way of a neon sign transformer, and then transmitted up the electrodes in the sculptures head.  I’m personally very pleased with the movement with this one.  All the action is generated within the abdomen.  The little pistons in the ankles act as shock absorbers to smooth out the motion.

Materials:

Industrial water valve, scaffold tubing, street light support arms, glass tube, vacuum cleaners, lamp fixtures, bicycle pedal cranks, neon sign transformer, gears from floor polisher, magnifying lens, drain cover, high voltage vacuum tubes, hydraulic dampers, plastic, phenolic, motor, LEDs

New piece to share: “High Voltage“ 2012 (102” x 65” x 24”)

This sculpture uses an effect known as a “Jacob’s Ladder”.  A high voltage arc is produced by way of a neon sign transformer, and then transmitted up the electrodes in the sculptures head.  I’m personally very pleased with the movement with this one.  All the action is generated within the abdomen.  The little pistons in the ankles act as shock absorbers to smooth out the motion.

Materials:

Industrial water valve, scaffold tubing, street light support arms, glass tube, vacuum cleaners, lamp fixtures, bicycle pedal cranks, neon sign transformer, gears from floor polisher, magnifying lens, drain cover, high voltage vacuum tubes, hydraulic dampers, plastic, phenolic, motor, LEDs

This is the second time Wired Magazine has printed this photo (this time in their UK version) without bothering to credit me or my sculpture. The image is used to support an article about Andy Rubin (he’s the one wearing pants), the man behind the Android operating system. Is it too much to ask that Art be considered as intellectual property, or at least valued in some way like every other business? I mean, come on, they’re printing a picture of a giant, anatomically correct, gun toting robot. Why bother even staging such a photo if it’s image isn’t compelling enough to warrant some kind of interest from their readers? Why not do the honorable thing and at least mention the guy who spent countless hours and dollars creating the thing? How hard is it to print a tiny little image credit?
O.K. done ranting now.